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Enjoy the Tour de France™ 2021 with BIKE24 – Ride like the Pros!

The Tour de France™ is the toughest road race in the world. But it also stands for the freedom to ride through great landscapes. The Tour de France™ is as much a part of the French way of life as delicious baguettes and good wine. From the 26th June to the 18th July 2021, 23 teams with their best riders will fight for the yellow jersey on 3,383 km across France. For your best Tour feeling we have prepared something special in 2021: BIKE24 is the official retailer of licensed Tour de France™ products likes replicas of the Tour de France™ jerseys, fancy apparel, cool merchandise and bike gear. » Read more

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Discover the Tour de France™ with the BIKE24 Topic Page

In the second year of the pandemic, the Grande Boucle is still going strong and in its 108th edition in the birthplace of road cycling sports, France, it is more classically well-balanced than it has been for a long time.

Become a Tour de France™ 2021 expert with the following topics:

An Overview of the 2021 Tour de France™ Stages

On 26 June, the starting gun will be fired in Brest for the peloton of the 2021 Tour de France™, a date that the biggest cycling teams and their top riders have been working towards for a whole year. Between now and 18 July, 21 great stages will show whether one of the youngsters or one of the old pros will roll into Paris on the Champs-Élysées with the yellow jersey and win the Tour de France™ 2021 again.

There is something for every type of rider – four flat to hilly stages right at the start, two individual time trials, eight flat and up to 248 km long stages for sprinters such as German hope Pascal Ackermann (BORA hansgrohe), all-rounders and punchers as well as six mountain stages form the main cornerstones of the 108th Tour de France™ edition.

But first things first: Four stages through Brittany form this year's prologue (the Grand Depart) towards the south-east into the interior of the country, before the contenders for the overall victory will have to show their hands (and legs) on stage 5 in the 27 km individual time trial. At the latest in stage 7, which is only hilly with 3108 metres of vertical gain but the longest stage with 248 km, the crucial racing phase will start. Afterwards, the very demanding mountain stages with almost 30000 metres of altitude difference will start in the Alps and later in the Pyrenees. What means extreme exertion for the riders, challenges climbing specialists to a stage win and separates the wheat from the chaff in the overall classification, becomes a true spectacle for the enthusiastic fans, especially at the mountain arrivals in Tignes, Saint-Lary-Soulan Col du Portet and Luz Ardiden. But that's not all. With the climbing double over the Mont Ventoux on stage 11, the route planners let a legendary cycling summit shine in new splendour.
When, after 19 stages, the points for the polka-dot Tour de France™ mountains jersey will already have been distributed, the overall Tour de France™ classification for the yellow jersey will probably still be left with a question mark. In the second, 31 km long individual time trial, a breath-taking final will help decide who will be immortalised in the annals of cycling and crowned as the overall winner at the Tour d'Honneur in Paris on 18 July.

This year's edition of the Tour will once again uniquely combine the historic Tour de France™ spirit and the passion for performance-oriented cycling.
Whether at home in front of the TV, on the road bike or even live on stage: With the right fan gear such as jerseys, water bottles, caps and much more, you can easily become part of the world's biggest cycling event and support your favourites and teams in the best possible way!

A Tour de France™ landmark and the setting for the final stage

Tour de France™ 2021 Road Map

Stage Date Start – Finish Distance Type
1. 26th June Brest – Landerneau 187 km Hilly stage
2. 27th June Perros-Guirec – Mûr-de-Bretagne 182 km Hilly stage
3. 28th June Lorient – Pontivy 182 km Flat stage
4. 29th June Redon – Fougères 152 km Flat stage
5. 30th June Changé – Laval 27 km Individual time trial
6. 1st July Tours – Châteauroux 144 km Flat stage
7. 2nd July Vierzon – Le Creusot 248 km Hilly stage
8. 3rd July Oyonnax – Le Grand-Bornand 151 km Mountain stage
9. 4th July Cluses – Tignes 145 km Mountain stage
Rest Day 5th July Tignes    
10. 6th July Albertville – Valence 186 km Flat stage
11. 7th July Sorgues – Malaucène (über Mont Ventoux) 199 km  Mountain stage
12 8th July Saint-Paul-Trois-Châteaux – Nîmes 161 km Flat stage
13. 9th July Nîmes – Carcassonne 220 km Flat stage
14. 10th July Carcassonne – Quillan 184 km Hilly stage
15. 11th July Céret – Andorra-la-Vielle 192 km Mountain stage
Rest Day 12th July Andorra    
16. 13th July Pas de la Casa – Saint-Gaudens 169 km Hilly stage
17. 14th July Muret – Saint-Lary-Soulan (Col de Portet) 178 km Mountain stage  
18. 15th July Pau – Luz Ardiden 130 km Mountain stage
19. 16th July Mourenx – Libourne 203 km Flat stage
20. 17th July Libourne – Saint-Émilion 31 km Individual time trial
21. 18th July Chatou – Paris Champs-Élysées 112 km Flat stage

The Most Thrilling Tour de France™ Stages in Detail

Tour de France™ mountain stage with hundreds of fans along the route

On 26 June, the Tour de France™ riders will start for the 1st stage from Brest to Landerneau. This 187 km long stage is one of four stages that make up the prologue (the Grand Départ) of the Tour de France™ through Brittany.
But a relaxed roll-in is not likely to happen. On the flat and thus fast stage, it will probably get down to business early on with wind conditions close to the coast and probably breakaway groups or individual punchers and all-rounders such as the experienced Alejandro Valverde from Team Movistar will try to win the race solo.
No time to rest – already on the second 182 km long stage from Perros-Guirec to Mûr-de-Bretagne Gerlédan the Big Loop makes its first small loop, because the riders have to cross the "wall" of Mûr-de-Bretagne twice with an average gradient of 7% and a length of 2 km each.

After two more rather sprint-friendly stages, specialists are in demand again on the fifth stage, the first time trial. Experienced time trialists such as the Swiss Stefan Küng of Groupama-FDJ and the exceptional German athlete in the ranks of Team Jumbo-Visma Tony Martin will show what they are made of on super-aerodynamic time trial bikes.

The brilliant finale of the first week is the 7th Tour de France™ stage from Vierzon to Le Creusot. Anyone who wants a Tour with exciting solo rides and breakaway attempts should put an exclamation mark on the Tour calendar here. With exactly 247.91 km, 3108 metres of vertical gain – no less than four 1st category mountain classifications – and the magnificent landscape in the Centre-Val de Loire region, this stage has everything an exciting race needs. Will the stage be won by a single rider such as the classics specialist Tiesj Benoot from the German DSM team or will well-staffed teams such as Movistar, BORA hansgrohe or Trek-Segafredo control the race early on? We will know more on 2nd July 2021.

In the following two stages, especially for sprinters and all-rounders who have already fought for classification points or a stage win, it's time to grit their teeth once again, because the Alps have been reached and are calling for climbers. On 12 classification mountains and at the first mountain finish at 2117 m in Tignes, mountain riders like Bauke Mollema of Trek-Segafredo will make their first attacks on the polka-dot mountain jersey and the leader in the overall classification will try to defend the yellow jersey.

After a first, well-deserved rest day, the following Tour days will provide plenty of excitement by alternating between flat and mountainous stages. A key section will be the 1,909 m high Mont-Ventoux in the 11th stage, as this mountain, which is monumental for cyclists, has to be mastered twice.

Over two flat and hilly stages, the Tour de France™ will enter the eastern Pyrenees for the first time on 11 July. In stage 15, the riders have to climb a good 4500 metres of vertical gain from Céret to the capital Andorra-la-Vielle of the tranquil principality of Andorra.

Another second rest day and the peloton enters the all-important third week and mountain riders like Miguel Ángel López from the Team Movistar squad can once again show what they are made of in the mountain climbs in Saint-Lary-Soulan on the Col de Portet or Luz Ardiden for the polka-dot jersey. After leaving the Pyrenees, the question is who will still have grit on the second to last day in the individual time trial and can force what will probably be an early decision on the overall Tour de France™ victory in Saint-Emilion. The previous German hope Emanuel Buchmann has unfortunately decided against the Tour de France™ and in favour for the Giro in 2021. But there is a good omen for German riders such as Simon Geschke (Cofidis) – Jan Ullrich won the time trial at the same location 25 years ago and finished the Tour in 2nd place before making the dream of winning the Tour perfect in 1997.

With not too many mountains and a whopping 58 kilometres in total in the time trial, the 108th edition of the Big Loop will most likely be a Tour for all-rounders. Riders like Tom Dumoulin, the former time trial world champion and Giro winner in 2017, or the generally strong Primož Roglič and his team of great supporters from Team Jumbo-Visma or the 2020 Tour de France™ winner Tadej Pogačar (UAE Emirates) will most likely enjoy the course distribution and profile. The experienced 2018 Tour winner Geraint Thomas and Riche Porte who finishes the Tour third in 2020 both from the Ineos Grenadiers team, the performance curves also continue to point upwards, which is why at least one of the two is also considered a hot prospect for a top place.

The Tour de France™ a cycling competition for teams as well as solo-riders

Road Bikes, Spare Wheels, Souvenirs and Calories – The Tour in Numbers

As the largest annual sporting event in the world, the Tour is also a masterpiece of organisation. The teams are travelling with a 12-ton truck and several team vehicles to transport the huge amount of material and food for the riders. Even internationally not so successful teams like the lucky wildcard winners B&B Hotels p/b KTM or Total Direct Energie have several sporting directors, masseurs, mechanics, doctors, chauffeurs and cooks with them for the duration of the tour.

In addition, at least 30 Tour de France™ road bikes worth 7000-15000 euros, which have been designed to be even more streamlined than ever before. The matching lightweight road helmets, glasses and caps and around 50 saddle models e. g. from Selle Italia or Fizik, handlebar tapes, sprockets, handlebars and carbon wheels and replacement tires, e. g. made by Continental are a must. For team and individual time trials, at least 20 additional aerodynamic time trial bikes, time trial suits, special aero bars (up to approx. 1000 Euro) and the drop-shaped aero helmets (approx. 170-600 Euro) are required. Road bike shoes, pedals, shift components – the list could be continued for a long time to come. And for the many jerseys, socks, arm and leg warmers, jackets, gloves and trousers, washing machines are available in the team bus, so that not only the riders' legs are fresh again at the start of the next stage.

And if, despite the best possible organisation in the race, a rider with a technical defect cannot be supported by his own team, there are still the neutral service vehicles. At the Tour de France™ 2021, these will be provided by no one less than Shimano, the bicycle parts manufacturer par excellence in prestigious blue.

In order to replenish the up to 15000 kilocalories that a professional cyclist burns per stage as quickly as possible, many carbohydrates are needed. Each team has between 2000-3000 gels and bars alone, e.g. from sports nutrition specialists such as Namedsport, in their luggage to be consumed on the bike. Against thirst and for the spectators each team has approximately 3000 bottles on stock. They are not only very popular as water dispensers, but also as souvenirs. So everything has been thought of. The cyclists only have to do the pedalling themselves.

The Tour de France™ Jerseys and Their Scoring

This is what the Tour de France™ winners' jerseys look like

A few points for the green jersey and a few seconds of time bonuses there for the overall classification – if you don't constantly keep an eye on the Tour de France™ in the media, you'll find it hard to keep track of the classification. But don't worry, we'll explain the meaning of each Tour de France™ jersey and how the classification is arrived at.

The Yellow Jersey of the Classification Leader

The leader in the time classification (overall classification) has the honour of wearing the yellow jersey (French: maillot jaune) – the dream of every professional cyclist; to ride in yellow once in their racing career, even if only for one stage. The yellow jersey may well change its carrier several times during the Tour de France™. The rider who leads at the end of the previous stage can wear it at the start of the next stage until the finish. A special feature of the Tour de France™ – this year there are also classification finishes with bonus seconds. On the following Tour de France™ stages/sections, 8, 5 and 2 seconds can be earned:

Stage 2: Mûr-de-Bretagne (1st section)
Stage 7: Signal d’Uchon
Stage 8: Col de la Colombière
Stage 11: Mont Ventoux, (2nd section)
Stage 14: Col de Saint-Louis 
Stage 15: Col de Beixalis 

The Polka-Dot Classification Jersey for the Best Climber

With a field of 184 competitors, there are many types of riders. One of them is the mountain rider/climber and the best of them will be awarded with a polka-dot classification jersey. If one of the riders manages to get the most mountain classification points on his scorecard, he will not only receive the Maillot à pois Rouges on July 18th in Paris, but also prize money of a whopping € 25000 and a lot more per mountain classification.
The points depend on the mountain category and on the ranking (1st-8th place). Mountains like the legendary Col du Tourmalet in the Pyrenees, which is also on the schedule in 2021, with an average gradient of more than 7.5%, belong to the highest category, the Hors Catégorie (HC). 

This is how the mountain classification for polka-dot mountain jerseys is created:

Category

Point distribution according to the ranking

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Hors Catégorie

20

15

12

10

8

6

4

2

1st category

10

8

6

4

2

1

   

2nd category

5

3

2

1

       

3rd category

2

1

           

4th category

1

             

The Green Jersey for the Best Sprint Rider

Almost all cycling fans know and like him, the friendly Czech Peter Sagan from Team Bora hansgrohe. He will also be sprinting for the points for the green jersey in the 108th edition. For the Maillot Vert, as the Tour de France™ green jersey is called in French, the points are distributed in a similar way to the mountains jersey. Most stages offer intermediate classifications as the riders pass through well-known towns and cities, where the comparatively stronger riders sprint for the points. And a great final takes place when the peloton crosses the finish line. Approximately 1000 metres before the finish, the top teams bring their sprinters or potential stage winners into position via approaching helpers at speeds already above 55 km/h. Barely two hundred metres before the finish, the final sprint is at up to 70 km/h.

This is how the sprint classification for the green jersey is created:

Category of arrival/sprint

Point distribution according to the ranking

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Flat stage

50

30

20

18

16

14

12

10

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

Medium-mountain stage

30

25

22

19

17

15

13

11

9

7

6

5

4

3

2

Mountain Stage, Individual time trial and Intermediate sprints

20

17

15

13

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

 

Further Tour de France™ Classification Jerseys

In addition to the more famous Tour de France™ jerseys, there is also the white jersey to award the best young rider. In addition, the most combative rider, who can be identified by the red race number on his back, and the team with the best placed riders overall – yellow race numbers – will also receive prize money.

Do you particularly like one of the jerseys or does it simply suit you and your riding style? Then get your official Tour de France™ jersey from Le Coq Sportif now to express your cycling passion.

What Makes a Road Bike for Professional Racing?

On more than 3000 kilometres with many metres of altitude within a few weeks, serpentine descents at over 100 km/h and top sprint performances of over 2000 watts, a road bike for the pros has to withstand a lot. At the same time, however, it must be particularly light – preferably under 7 kg (minimum 6.8 kg) – and aerodynamic.
We show you how this is possible with the Cannondale Road Bike SUPERSIX EVO Hi-Mod DISC Replica. A semi-aero bike with the frame in team colours that the pros from Team Education First (EF) around Hugh Carthy and Rigoberto Urán also use for competitions.

The Cannondale SUPERSIX EVO Hi-Mod DISC Replica road bike is your optimal basis for top performance. If you want to bring your power to the tarmac even more efficiently, then do it like the pros and upgrade...

...The wheels – On flat and mountain stages, the pros often use carbon wheels for disc brakes with a rim profile depth of around 50 mm and ceramic bearings that run smooth as silk. The first choice here is the top series such as Shimano Dura-Ace, FSA-Vision (Team EF) or Mavic Cosmic.

...The shifting system – One shifting error and the competitor takes the race. For even more shifting precision, electronic derailleur systems such as Shimano Dura Ace Di2, SRAM eTap AXS or Campagnolo Super Record EPS series are standard on the bikes of all Tour de France™ riders. The latest road bike shifting groups even offer 2x12 gears in order to achieve more harmonious gear steps with a higher range.

...Performance measurement – There is no Tour de France™ team today that does not rely on training planning and a race strategy using systematic performance analyses. The basis for this are power meters, which you can also retrofit to your race machine. These systems, which are often integrated into cranks from Shimano, SRAM or Rotor, for example, as well as in pedals from Look and Garmin, measure the wattage and send it wirelessly to your bike computer for display and analysis.